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UnknownKadath

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PostSubject: Personal favourite directors   Wed Feb 23, 2011 7:55 pm

Simple question - who are your personal favourite directors? The directors overall skill or talent isn't the most relevant thing here, so if you adore a director who may not exactly be considered the greatest filmmaker out there - add them anyways. As I said, this is your list of personal favourites. Feel free to elaborate.

My favourite director is David Cronenberg. I actually saw a lot of dumb slashers as a kid, but when I was 12 or so my mum showed me "The Fly." It changed my outlook on horror films completely - the idea that a horror film could be mature, intelligent, and amount to something more than most of the other horror flicks I saw at the time was actually something new to me. As such "The Fly" kind of holds a special spot in my heart and is still one of my favourites, though I love most of Croneyboig's other films as well; especially VideoDrome and Naked Lunch. I will admit I wish he would return to the body horror genre, but I don't think he's a bad dramatic director. A History of Violence was good. I'll also admit that knowing his penchant for sexual psychology, he is an absolutely perfect choice to be directing "A Dangerous Method" - which is to be about Carl Jung and Sigmund Freud and how they founded modern psychology. That'll certainly be interesting.

Lucio Fulci is another personal favourite - and a good reason why I specified that overall talent isn't necessary in this thread, 'cause technically Fulci wasn't exactly a "Good" director - but damn did he know how to have fun, even if I will never understood why he had such a vendetta against eyeballs. Fulci movies always manage to put me in a good mood. One of my favourites - regardless of the fact a lot of it uses footage from his other films - is "A Cat in the Brain." It may not pull off the concept in a masterful fashion, but regardless I love the idea behind the film - basically, Fulci plays himself and becomes desensitized by all the sick violence in his own movies. He goes to see a psychiatrist who happens to form some sort of fetish for his movies, and decides to exploit poor loony Mr. Fulci by acting out Fulci's movies and pinning the killings on him. There are a lot of funny moments and Fulci is a somewhat likable guy if not a little weird to watch.

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Frank Rizzo

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PostSubject: Re: Personal favourite directors   Wed Feb 23, 2011 8:17 pm

My personal favs director wise are Kevin Smith, Cronenberg, John Carpenter, and Quinten Tarantino.
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UnknownKadath

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PostSubject: Re: Personal favourite directors   Wed Feb 23, 2011 8:41 pm

Frank Rizzo wrote:
My personal favs director wise are Kevin Smith, Cronenberg, John Carpenter, and Quinten Tarantino.

Quentin Tarantino is my wife Chie's favourite director. I don't think I love him as much as she does, but I do enjoy a lot of his movies. I actually think Inglorious Basterds is my favourite of his, even if a lot of Tarantino fans give me a funny look when I pick that one as my favourite. I don't know the idea of a WWII Western was just too bloody perfect.

I'm mixed on Kevin Smith. I loved the Clerks pictures and Zack & Miri Make a Porno, and while I don't hate the others I've seen by him (I haven't seen them all - I haven't seen Chasing Amy or Jersey Girl.) I think a lot of them are... meh. I remember "Jay & Silent Bob Strike Back" being a disappointment - not that I had super high expectations, but because there was so much lame material and then an absolutely hilarious 3rd act. When they were in Hollywood, THAT was great. Especially the Wes Craven bit. If the killer in Scream 4 isn't a monkey, I will be very disappointed. x3

I love Carpenter. It's a shame that he has plenty of lame movies on his resume, but when you have movies like Escape from New York, The Thing, Halloween, They Live and Big Trouble in Little China (All movies that would show up on my top 50 of all time) it's kind of hard to say that the bad outweighs the good cause it doesn't, even if I constantly argue with people about that when Carpenter is brought up.
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IAKO



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PostSubject: Re: Personal favourite directors   Thu Feb 24, 2011 1:11 am

Count me in as one of John Carpenter's fan, the often mentioned trio of Escape from New York, The Thing and Big Trouble in Little China is one of the main reason why I fell in love with cinema in the first place. The Thing remains my favorite horror movie of all-time and I think that BTiLC is the perfect action-comedy.

Another one of my favorite director is Tsui Hark, I already came to the defense of his much maligned Knock Off in "The Worst Movie You Have Seen While Actually Being in the Theater" thread and my avatar and nickname come from that movie in question. I think it's a delightful little action flick and it has a special place in my heart for introducing me to Tsui Hark, but truth to be told, it's nothing compared to his best work. Butterfly Murders, Shanghai Blues, Peking Opera Blues, The Blade and more, all fantastic movies. And then, there's my favourite film of all-time ; Dangerous Encounters : 1st Kind - Director's Cut (yes, it makes a big difference). If you have the chance to watch it, jump on the occasion.

The last member of my "Holy Trinity" of filmmaking is Sergio Leone. Once Upon a Time in the West is as close to perfect a movie can go. Too bad he didn't even direct 10 movies, but I guess quality is better than quantity.

UnknownKadath wrote:
Lucio Fulci is another personal favourite - and a good reason why I specified that overall talent isn't necessary in this thread, 'cause technically Fulci wasn't exactly a "Good" director - but damn did he know how to have fun, even if I will never understood why he had such a vendetta against eyeballs.
I haven't seen nearly enough Lucio Fulci's films to judge his overall talent has a director, but the movies of his I've seen were pretty damn well directed, especially The Beyond.
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PostSubject: Re: Personal favourite directors   Thu Feb 24, 2011 1:19 am

Alfred Hitchcock, David Lynch, Darren Aronofsky, Quentin Tarantino, The Coen Brothers, Stanley Kubrick, Martin Scorsese, Sergio Leone, Charlie Kaufman (I abide by snob rule #2!), and, of course, Tommy Wiseau.


Last edited by Tommy Wiseau on Thu Feb 24, 2011 3:57 am; edited 1 time in total
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PostSubject: Re: Personal favourite directors   Thu Feb 24, 2011 3:48 am

My top 3 directors are Stanley Kubrick, the Coen Brothers and Christopher Nolan. I can't really explain what I like about them, they all just make really great movies. And if we're just talking film-makers in general, I also really like Charlie Kaufman (and I know he directed Synedoche, New York, but he's much more known as a writer, because that's what he did on his biggest movies).
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PostSubject: Re: Personal favourite directors   Thu Feb 24, 2011 4:24 am

This is somewhat difficult for me. Many directors have films that just are not very good, even if they have done many classics. Then there are directors that have only one or two great films that I adore. But here is a list of directors I have always tried to view their work.

Akira Kurosawa

John Sayles

Charles Chaplin

John Carpenter

Kenneth Branagh (mostly his early work)

Terry Gilliam

John Ford

George Stevens



Just a few.
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Frank Rizzo

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PostSubject: Re: Personal favourite directors   Thu Feb 24, 2011 4:50 am

"Akira Kurosawa

Terry Gilliam"

Oh man, forgot about these two.
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UnknownKadath

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PostSubject: Re: Personal favourite directors   Thu Feb 24, 2011 6:40 am

Son Of Jack Deth wrote:
This is somewhat difficult for me. Many directors have films that just are not very good, even if they have done many classics. Then there are directors that have only one or two great films that I adore. But here is a list of directors I have always tried to view their work.

Akira Kurosawa

John Sayles

Charles Chaplin

John Carpenter

Kenneth Branagh (mostly his early work)

Terry Gilliam

John Ford

George Stevens



Just a few.

I actually haven't heard of a couple of them (John Sayles, John Ford, George Stevens) at least not by name. I'm curious what movies they've done though, cause otherwise I can say you have excellent taste. Terry Gilliam is another one of my favourite directors, and so is Akira Kurosawa. Kurosawa's "Dreams" was the first Japanese language movie I saw, shortly after I learned the language from Kayoko when I was about 6 or 7. I'm actually surprised I had the patience for such a movie at that age, but I loved the beauty of some of the sequences, and it was one of those films that was important to my interest in pursuing the art-form. I especially loved the Dream with the art-student in van Gogh's paintings, as well as that Twilight Zone-esque dream about the cowardly military general who gets an unexpected visit from his troops' spirits.

Gilliam also impressed me when I was a kid with "Time Bandits." I still have a soft spot for that one, especially the villain. Evil is hilarious. I like most of Gilliam's movies, even if some of his more recent ones haven't been great. I have to be honest - I'm shocked that "Fear & Loathing in Las Vegas" is suddenly getting a lot of attention and love. Aside from Depp and Del Toro's spot on performances as Raul Duke and Dr. Gonzo (respectively) and Gilliam's direction, that movie was horrible in my opinion; and I'm a fan of the original essay/article/whateveryouwanttocallit that it was based on. I was pleasantly surprised with Imaginarium of Dr. Parnassus though. Definitely his most enjoyable in awhile. Though I'm in a minority that actually liked "Tideland," even though I wish it actually had gone somewhere with its ending.

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The Original Greaser Bob

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PostSubject: Re: Personal favourite directors   Thu Feb 24, 2011 6:51 am

UnknownKadath wrote:
I will never understood why he had such a vendetta against eyeballs.
Perhaps he was resentful of the fact that he had to wear glasses.
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PostSubject: Re: Personal favourite directors   Thu Feb 24, 2011 6:51 am

The Dude wrote:
UnknownKadath wrote:
I will never understood why he had such a vendetta against eyeballs.
Perhaps he was resentful of the fact that he had to wear glasses.

Sounds logical Captain.
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The Original Greaser Bob

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PostSubject: Re: Personal favourite directors   Thu Feb 24, 2011 6:55 am

UnknownKadath wrote:
I love Carpenter. It's a shame that he has plenty of lame movies on his resume, but when you have movies like Escape from New York, The Thing, Halloween, They Live and Big Trouble in Little China (All movies that would show up on my top 50 of all time) it's kind of hard to say that the bad outweighs the good cause it doesn't, even if I constantly argue with people about that when Carpenter is brought up.

It happens. Kind of like how for the last several years Tim Burton has put out nothing but crap, but I have to love him because of the early films he brought us.
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Frank Rizzo

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PostSubject: Re: Personal favourite directors   Thu Feb 24, 2011 6:57 am

The Dude wrote:
UnknownKadath wrote:
I love Carpenter. It's a shame that he has plenty of lame movies on his resume, but when you have movies like Escape from New York, The Thing, Halloween, They Live and Big Trouble in Little China (All movies that would show up on my top 50 of all time) it's kind of hard to say that the bad outweighs the good cause it doesn't, even if I constantly argue with people about that when Carpenter is brought up.

It happens. Kind of like how for the last several years Tim Burton has put out nothing but crap, but I have to love him because of the early films he brought us.

I dunno, I kinda liked his latest stuff, but maybe it's just me.
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PostSubject: Re: Personal favourite directors   Thu Feb 24, 2011 7:01 am

Frank Rizzo wrote:
The Dude wrote:
UnknownKadath wrote:
I love Carpenter. It's a shame that he has plenty of lame movies on his resume, but when you have movies like Escape from New York, The Thing, Halloween, They Live and Big Trouble in Little China (All movies that would show up on my top 50 of all time) it's kind of hard to say that the bad outweighs the good cause it doesn't, even if I constantly argue with people about that when Carpenter is brought up.

It happens. Kind of like how for the last several years Tim Burton has put out nothing but crap, but I have to love him because of the early films he brought us.

I dunno, I kinda liked his latest stuff, but maybe it's just me.
Some of it was decent, but a lot of it was either disappointing or infuriating.
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PostSubject: Re: Personal favourite directors   Thu Feb 24, 2011 7:04 am

I liked 9, I liked Sweeny Todd, I liked Big Fish. Alice in Wonderland was so-so, and Charlie in the Chocolate Factory.....meh, I liked the Gene Wilder version better.
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PostSubject: Re: Personal favourite directors   Thu Feb 24, 2011 7:09 am

Frank Rizzo wrote:
I liked 9, I liked Sweeny Todd, I liked Big Fish. Alice in Wonderland was so-so, and Charlie in the Chocolate Factory.....meh, I liked the Gene Wilder version better.
I liked Big Fish a lot too, might be my favorite of his along with Ed Wood. Not very anxious to see Charlie and the Chocolate Factory or Alice in Wonderland though, they look just awful.
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Frank Rizzo

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PostSubject: Re: Personal favourite directors   Thu Feb 24, 2011 7:11 am

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory *was* awful. Alice in Wonderland wasn't so much awful as just veeeeeeeeery long.
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PostSubject: Re: Personal favourite directors   Thu Feb 24, 2011 7:18 am

The Dude wrote:
UnknownKadath wrote:
I love Carpenter. It's a shame that he has plenty of lame movies on his resume, but when you have movies like Escape from New York, The Thing, Halloween, They Live and Big Trouble in Little China (All movies that would show up on my top 50 of all time) it's kind of hard to say that the bad outweighs the good cause it doesn't, even if I constantly argue with people about that when Carpenter is brought up.

It happens. Kind of like how for the last several years Tim Burton has put out nothing but crap, but I have to love him because of the early films he brought us.

I wouldn't say "Nothing but Crap," just "Mostly crap" for the last several years. Am I the only person in the universe who liked "Big Fish" and "Sweeney Todd?" Sad Yeah, those are probably the only things he's made in the 00's I enjoyed - but I really enjoyed them. Big Fish especially.
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PostSubject: Re: Personal favourite directors   Thu Feb 24, 2011 7:26 am

UnknownKadath wrote:
The Dude wrote:
UnknownKadath wrote:
I love Carpenter. It's a shame that he has plenty of lame movies on his resume, but when you have movies like Escape from New York, The Thing, Halloween, They Live and Big Trouble in Little China (All movies that would show up on my top 50 of all time) it's kind of hard to say that the bad outweighs the good cause it doesn't, even if I constantly argue with people about that when Carpenter is brought up.

It happens. Kind of like how for the last several years Tim Burton has put out nothing but crap, but I have to love him because of the early films he brought us.

I wouldn't say "Nothing but Crap," just "Mostly crap" for the last several years. Am I the only person in the universe who liked "Big Fish" and "Sweeney Todd?" Sad Yeah, those are probably the only things he's made in the 00's I enjoyed - but I really enjoyed them. Big Fish especially.

If you read my post before, I said I liked both of those movies. rabbit
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PostSubject: Re: Personal favourite directors   Thu Feb 24, 2011 7:35 am

UnknownKadath wrote:
Son Of Jack Deth wrote:
This is somewhat difficult for me. Many directors have films that just are not very good, even if they have done many classics. Then there are directors that have only one or two great films that I adore. But here is a list of directors I have always tried to view their work.

Akira Kurosawa

John Sayles

Charles Chaplin

John Carpenter

Kenneth Branagh (mostly his early work)

Terry Gilliam

John Ford

George Stevens



Just a few.

I actually haven't heard of a couple of them (John Sayles, John Ford, George Stevens) at least not by name. I'm curious what movies they've done though...



John Ford was king of the westerns and him and George Stevens were probably two of the most influential directors of all time. John did films like: The Searchers, How Green Was My Valley, and The Quiet Man. George Stevens did: Shane, Giant, Gunga Din, and Alice Adams.

John Sayles is a bit more modern, but intriguing none the less. He would raise money for his independent films by writing movies like: Alligator, and Battle Beyond The Stars. His own films include: The Brother From Another Planet, Eight Men Out, Passion Fish, Limbo, and Lone Star.




I also really loved Sweeny Todd. Masterfully done. Hated Alice In Wonderland, and Charlie And The Chocolate Factory.
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The Original Greaser Bob

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PostSubject: Re: Personal favourite directors   Thu Feb 24, 2011 7:39 am

Frank Rizzo wrote:
UnknownKadath wrote:
The Dude wrote:
UnknownKadath wrote:
I love Carpenter. It's a shame that he has plenty of lame movies on his resume, but when you have movies like Escape from New York, The Thing, Halloween, They Live and Big Trouble in Little China (All movies that would show up on my top 50 of all time) it's kind of hard to say that the bad outweighs the good cause it doesn't, even if I constantly argue with people about that when Carpenter is brought up.

It happens. Kind of like how for the last several years Tim Burton has put out nothing but crap, but I have to love him because of the early films he brought us.

I wouldn't say "Nothing but Crap," just "Mostly crap" for the last several years. Am I the only person in the universe who liked "Big Fish" and "Sweeney Todd?" Sad Yeah, those are probably the only things he's made in the 00's I enjoyed - but I really enjoyed them. Big Fish especially.

If you read my post before, I said I liked both of those movies. rabbit
Point is, the man has accumulated his share of black-marks on his resume.
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PostSubject: Re: Personal favourite directors   Thu Feb 24, 2011 8:21 am

In no particular order:

Ed Wood- The guy's just so friggin' likeable. Even in the dark depths of things like "Orgy of the Dead," there's this feeling that he really loved film. Plus, Bela Lugosi and Criswell are great additions to ANY cast!

Gualtiero Jacopetti & Franco Prosperi- The Mondo Cane duo. They have an interesting dynamic; with Jacopetti the celebrity director and Prosperi the soft-spoken naturalist. As a result, their films give a unique, narrative quality to real events. Like Wood, they care about film; during the shooting of a documentary on political unrest in Africa, Africa Addio, they almost faced a firing squad until it was discovered that they were Italian, not British colonialists, and they could escape. And, unlike most documentarians, they really do report objectively; Goodbye Uncle Tom, a documentary of slavery in the American South and how it fueled racial hatred through the Black Panther movement of the late 60s, criticizes both the cruelty of the slave masters and the violence of black militant groups. They also always shoot some beautiful footage edited together so a 136 minute movie flies by.

Dario Argento- Argento didn't invent the giallo (that honor usually goes to his mentor, Mario Bava), but he took genre conventions and raised them to an art, culminating in the fantastically stylized Suspiria, Inferno, and Opera. While I'm not hugely thrilled with his more recent work, it, like his early output, shows signs of a distinct quality all his own.

Jacques Tourneur- The studio gave him titles like "Cat People" and "I Walked With a Zombie," and he made them lush, dark, psychological nightmares. Producer Val Lewton is also very responsible for the content of Tourneur's films, but the two worked together well to create masterpieces on a fairly low budget.

James Whale- Like Tourneur, but with a generous dose of camp; Whale never failed to entertain.

Fritz Lang- M. Metropolis. Dr. Mabuse. Lang has created some of the most iconic moments and concepts in film, and they still play out as fresh as ever. Like Jacopetti and Prosperi, Lang makes a long movie feel short because of great pacing and interesting characters, like the terrifying and sympathetic Hans Beckert from M, a pedophile who you want to both lynch and hug. I'm a sucker for German Expressionism, and theirs no denying that Lang did it exceptionally, if not best.

Quentin Tarantino- Say what you will about the man himself, who comes across most of the time as egotistical, completely insane, or both, his films have an unmistakable style to them that I just love. The blending of exploitation film concepts to create a single, sythesized entity is something I try to do in my own films, and Tarantino does it very well. Kill Bill (Volume One in particular) has that blend of colorful stylization that I just love, as well as really cool, likable characters that you just want to know more about, but aren't annoyed by having too little information. Likewise, Jackie Brown and Reservoir Dogs, films with fairly slow starts, culminate in ways that make you really feel like you just went on a road trip with good friends and you don't want to leave them. Even Pulp Fiction, which I think falls apart entirely when it gets to the dreadful Golden Watch segment, makes what should be boring dialogue about hamburgers, foot massages, and who the waitress is dressed as really fun to listen to, and I lot like conversations I have with my friends.

Honorable mentions got to Lucio Fulci, who is extremely inspiring despite my only seeing City of the Living Dead, Zombi 2, The Beyond, and the House by the Cemetery, and William Lustig, a great person who is another inspiration, but I've only actually seen Maniac.
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PostSubject: Re: Personal favourite directors   Thu Feb 24, 2011 8:38 am

"Gualtiero Jacopetti & Franco Prosperi"

Ah, i forgot about them as well. Loved the Mondo Cane movies.
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PostSubject: Re: Personal favourite directors   Thu Feb 24, 2011 8:59 am

I've got a thing for Sam Raimi, myself.

And I've got to mention George Romero. After all, he's the individual most responsible for our modern idea of what a zombie is.
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PostSubject: Re: Personal favourite directors   Thu Feb 24, 2011 10:06 pm

The Dude wrote:
I've got a thing for Sam Raimi, myself.

And I've got to mention George Romero. After all, he's the individual most responsible for our modern idea of what a zombie is.
I've only seen the Evil Dead movies, but those sure to feed my unhealthy love of weird camera angles and POV shots.

Romero is pretty hit or miss, I think. Night of the Living Dead is terrifying, and Dawn of the Dead is my favorite movie ever, but Martin sadly had no idea what "pacing" and "plot" were.
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